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Tessa Russell

Title: You ripped out my mother tongue
Year: 2018
Length: 04:38
Credits: Tessa Williams
The work is of my mother’s journey without Te Reo Māori and it’s purpose is to raise awareness of the intergenerational trauma language loss can cause. It’s probably the most important piece of mahi I have ever put together in my life, because it’s not just her story. It’s my nanny’s, it’s mine, it’s my daughter’s, it’s New Zealand’s. This is OUR country’s history, this is OUR country’s language, so this is all of OUR responsibility to save it.
Thematic tags: Decoloniality, family, history, indigenous methodologies.

Tessa Russell’s practice is predominantly in photography and video. She utilizes her art to explore issues that affect her whānau, hapu, iwi, and community. Proud of both her Māori and Scottish ancestral lines, she understands the importance of adding her voice to conversations as an indigenous wahine and māmā.

www.moemoeacollective.com


Paige Pomana and Jazz dos Santos

Title: IN FRAME | Infamy Apparel
Year: 2020
Length: 04:25
Format: Single-channel video
Credits: Directed, filmed & produced by Paige Pomana & Jazz Dos Santos

IN FRAME is a collection of short films centred around the documentation of everyday creatives. Creative Director of Infamy Apparel, Amy Lautogo, spoke to us about shifting the paradigm of the portrayal of fat people in the fashion industry and how we need to reevaluate our individual conditioning under a colonial, capitalist, system.
Thematic tags: Performance, documentary, body, capitalism, politics, feminism, decoloniality, LGBTQ.

Sour Heart Productions is a videography production company based in Auckland, New Zealand. It was founded by filmmakers Paige Pomana and Jazz Dos Santos, who share a passion for artistic visual media and sound.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SourHeartProductions/
Instagram: @sourheartproductions
Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/sourheartproductions


Louise Stevenson

Title: In Conversation with the Architect
Year: 2012
Length: 18.00
Format: Digital video

Documentary like, this work re-visits a recorded conversation with Stevenson’s then ninety year old father, Charles Stevenson, about the King George Sixth Secondary School in Honiara, Solomon Islands which he designed in 1964. He was an architect in the British Colonial Service in Nigeria and Solomon Islands during the 1950s to 1970s and played a key role in the implementation of modern infrastructure in those tropical colonies. In the film, their discussion is enacted through their hands pointing to more recent footage of the buildings fifty years later in 2011, while an edited text of their dialogue runs in parallel to this. Perspectives on colonial history and national independence weave through the conversation between father and daughter highlighting generational shifts and memory slippage. The work considers issues at stake in the inter-relationship between spoken word and materiality via conversation, architectural history and representational film imagery. Stevenson discusses this work in her paper (Re)constructing Tropical Architecture in Solomon Islands: Conversations with my Father,” Fabrications: The Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, 24:2, 214-243
Thematic tags: Documentary, body, decoloniality, history, family, architecture, modernism.

Louise Stevenson’s practice spans broadly across drawing, painting, installation, photography and film. Her work predominantly engages with the position of being “outside” and a shifting relationship to place. She draws on non-Western ideas of navigation that locate a floating-fixed position on the Ocean. The formative experience of growing up as an expatriate in Honiara, Solomon Islands, as well as travelling and living in Europe, informs this interest. Projects include drawing series related to living in Budapest, Hungary, paintings exploring transparency and opacity, installations working with objects and materials referencing memory, and photographic and film work exploring the legacy of modern architecture in the tropics (includes MFA and Doctoral work).

Archival material, along with associated personal histories and their intersection with the public domain, informs Stevenson’s more recent work. An ongoing project involves the research and visual exploration of a substantial photographic archive gifted to Stevenson by her father who was an architect in the British Colonial service in Nigeria and Solomon Islands. This archive records tropical modern architecture’s trajectory from Africa to the Pacific, and a particular geo-political era of colonial and modernist history. Stevenson’s work attempts to re-represent this history within a framework of shifting perspectives while holding the irresolvable space of colonial history. Several projects stem from this research with on-going multi-form presentations across photography, film, installation and writing.

louisestevenson.net


Yakuri Kaihori

Title: Mono No Aware
Year: 2015
Length: 02:39
Format: Digital video

Mono no aware – is one of Japanese aesthetic value, an awareness of the impermanence and transience of life and the gentle sadness and wistfulness that comes with this knowledge – literally translates to “the pathos of things”. Mono no aware is universal that can be experienced by anyone though accepting life as it is relates to the core of the Zen practice. It teaches the mankind is not the centre of the world but in observing nature we see the life and death cycle and the mortality of being: everything with a beginning has an ending. This aesthetic put the emphasis on the ephemerality of mankind and insists that the we observes time and being. The present moment is the product of what has been done in the past. This work was made during the 3-months artist residency and exhibited at 30 Upstairs Art Space in Wellington in 2015 along with the series of paintings.
Thematic tags: Landscape, politics, environment/ecology, decoloniality, history, spirituality

Yukari Kaihori is a visual artist currently based in Tāmaki Makaurau. Kaihori is primarily a painter whose works change from project to project but a theme she often investigates is the “in- between-ness” of cultural and social values, the physicality of artworks, the Western and the Eastern, organic and mechanic, permanent and temporary, and nature and men. She has exhibited her work in both public and private spaces including we painted the wall with cracks (2020) play_station, This Land is All We Know (2019) Hastings City Art Gallery, Infinite Planes ( 2019) Parlour Project and Blue Fancy ( 2019) Milford Galleries. She was the recipient of Pollock Krasner Foundation Grant award in 2015 (NY), and was a Fellow at the Vermont Studio Center, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and Oberpfälzer Künstlerhaus in Germany.

https://www.instagram.com/yukari.kaihori


Edwina Stevens

https://player.vimeo.com/video/363108574

Title: The Material Thing is Vibrating Into the Emptiness
Year: 2019
Length: 24:12
Format: Single-channel video

The material thing vibrating into the emptiness is a video work considering the change encounter across various materialities. In this work, two phenomena of light, materiality, and time intersect. One element is comprised of winter light filters through a Eucalyptus tree, refracted through a warped 100-year-old windowpane onto the wall, on an oblique angle for a brief moment every day over a week, then it is gone. Another element is also of winter light, filtered through a different Eucalyptus, refracting through a glass on a shelf causing it to ‘bend’ around a corner and streak down the hallway wall. These moments were recorded every morning for the week and compiled together as visuals for live performance. In this production of this video, the visual was arranged to sound, and then in response, the performance is made to the visual, exploring the relationship between the two and the potential they carry in this relationship.
Thematic tags: Performance, abstraction, sound

Title: Lands Line
Year: 2015
Length: 11:09
Format: Single-channel video

This work was developed as a circular projection as visuals for live sound performance.Filmed from the back of the Taieri Gorge Train from Dunedin to Middlemarch, the video has been drawn out across frames to restrict the viewer focusing on any particular detail, prioritising the motion of moving through this valley only accessible for the train-line, time and space blurs past us. The work addresses the colonial lines we Pakeha make and follow on the landscape, following/exploiting water lines and indigenous Māori travel routes, while reflecting on the timelessness and remoteness of rural Southern Aotearoa.
Thematic tags: Landscape, environment/ecology, decoloniality, sound

Edwina Stevens (Dunedin, Aotearoa/Melbourne) is an audiovisual artist working across composition, installation and live performance focusing on synthesized sound, field recordings, found acoustic elements/instruments and obsolete media. Her work investigates audiovisual processes of engaging with places that are collaborative, improvisational and serendipitous, exploring entanglements of the temporal, material and experiential through chance encounters, tangential processes and unanticipated outcomes.

www.vimeo.com/eves
www.disrhythms.net
www.soundcloud.com/e_eves
eves.bandcamp.com


Emily Parr

Title: Te Aroha
Year: 2017
Length: 04:45
Format: HD video
Credits:
During the occupation* of Niki’s house, weekly waiata** nights have been held to foster whanaungatanga***. The collective voices can be heard along Taniwha Street on a Thursday evening, travelling easily because of the empty spaces. The redevelopment is physically dismantling Glen Innes, through the removal of houses by truck or demolition (in this video, 69 Taniwha Street). But in their place stands a different form of community – one that is growing ever stronger. On the day of filming (23/03), Niki had again been under a direct threat of eviction. She closed Waiata Club with this: “This has been the hardest day of these last six years. But we’re still here. And we’re still singing.”
Ngā mihi Tāmaki Housing Group & Waiata Club.
facebook.com/thishomeisoccupied
** song
*** kinship, a relationship of shared experiences through working together that creates a sense of belonging
Thematic tags: documentary, capitalism, politics, decoloniality, sound, spirituality, indigenous methodologies, housing (Te Aroha)

Title: Te Wai Mokoia
Year: 2016
Length: 17:30
Format: HD video
Credits:
Te Wai Mokoia was the winner of Uxbridge’s 10th Estuary Art Awards. It is a unique single edition belonging to the Auckland Council.

This work considers ecology not only in relation to biology, but in relation to a wider understanding of ecology – that of the relationships between people, their whenua, and social and political frameworks. It is centred on a specific ecology, presented through a kōrero between a kuia and her whāngai daughter, both long term residents of Glen Innes. The health of Te Wai Mokoia cannot be separated from its people, a community that is fighting to stay in their homes. 

Tāmaki is currently undergoing “regeneration”, a process through which thousands of state housing tenants are being affected. Many residents are refusing to be moved away from their homes – a collective resistance that is taking a huge toll on the community’s hauora. Our people are made vulnerable by a colonial capitalist state, and our safety nets are being removed through governmental policy.

The work considers all that extends from a house – childhood memories, the garden we bury in and grow from, and the environment surrounding it. For residents of Glen Innes, the estuary is a site of resource gathering, of learning and exploration, and a place to foster interconnectedness with nature. Te Wai Mokoia flows through this community as wairua tapu.
Thematic tags: documentary, capitalism, politics, decoloniality, environment/ecology, landscape sound, spirituality, indigenous methodologies, housing (Te Wai Mokoia)

Emily Parr (Ngāi Te Rangi, Moana, Pākehā) is a Tāmaki Makaurau based artist. Her current research (toward a Master of Visual Arts) is on settler-indigenous relationships of Te Moananui a Kiwa, and is anchored by those she descends from. Her moving-image practice weaves through time and space, seeking stories in archives, waters, and on haerenga to ancestral homelands. She is also a member of Accompany, an artists’ collective who walk and work alongside community organisations and social movements. Parr was the recipient of the 2019 Iris Fisher Scholarship and 2016 Tāmaki Estuary Art Award.

http://www.cargocollective.com/emilyparr


Moving Image Archive is a RM Gallery and Project Space project
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