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Natalie Tozer

Title: Footpath Fossil (breathe)
Year: 2020
Length: 20:26
Format: Looped H265 10bit,
Credits: Director: Natalie Tozer
Director of Photography & Editor: Sam Tozer
Original Soundtrack: Paul Rhodes

My work documents exposed urban stratigraphy. I look for layers that aren’t meant to be seen. Curbside ruins. Crumbled footpaths. Potholes. These layers are visible histories of life/nonlife entangled within the ground. I interpret these small moments in our urban landscape as interruptions to capitalist strategies. Mythically and metaphorically rich, the ground provides us with clues, knowledge, refuge as well as the sunken networks of extraction, exploitation and disposal. The ground is active, generous and vulnerable. We lace it with tar seal, concrete and gravel; stone blasted and rendered for our urban environments. I see my practice as a way to read and understand the ground as the surface to a complex underland . By collecting, documenting and deciphering the findings, I hope to gather enough data to learn something. I like to reach out in the dark, to gaze into a possible future and let the practice reveal the rest.

This year, I have filmed broken footpaths near and around Karangahape Rd, Tāmaki Makaurau. The markings from tools and previous layers of broken grout lie exposed for interpretation like messages from the underland lurching upwards eager to be seen.The recent COVID19 rahui brought repair and construction of the footpath to a halt. During this lull in productivity and progress I captured footage which now acts as a fossil record. I want to show through the work that I deeply admire the well- used areas we travel through. I want to acknowledge and contemplate the beauty of its worn complexity and explore the idea that meaningful production should be a subset of ‘care’. This approach is about revealing the alternative strategies against capitalist modes of production, where we focus on tending and caring for what we have, instead of perpetuating in an ever-expanding frenzy.

The rahui gave me and my nine-year-old daughter Penelope time to walk around our neighborhood, where she carefully acted as a pathfinder and navigational keeper of our mutual discovery. Together, we found and surveyed small poetic moments of urban decay, some of which will never be fixed, remaining arrested in time just the way they are. These places are entanglements where the underground reaches through the ever-expanding mask of concrete, the mark of empire building since the Roman times. For me, these walks enact soft lines of experience and memory, weaving relational becomings in common worlds. They are perspectives on Life and Nonlife, and the offer of coexistence. Through exploring and striving to understand I try to invite the possibility of symbiotic and improbable collaborations into my practice and relationships.

Perhaps in years to come, this geontological learning and speculation will emerge into the next generation through Penelope. I smile when she unearths small findings from the curb, lichen encrusted tar seal crumbles. Like finding a perfect shell on a storm swept beach, she collects and clutches her find all the way home to show me. A small offering from the messy entangled ground.


Thematic tags: Documentary, capitalism, environment/ecology, abstraction, sound, family

Title: Soothsayer
Year: 2018
Length: 03:50
Format: 4K looped video
Credits: Director: Natalie Tozer, Director of Photography & Editor: Sam Tozer

The gentle, calming nature of this work establishes a contrast with the severity of social and environmental realities today. A meditative kaleidoscopic loop of destruction aims to scale potential future outcomes into a series of digestible alternative offerings. This video work slowly crushes folded paper ‘fortune tellers’; cootie catchers, chatterboxes, whirlybirds or paku-paku. Hand folded paper objects used by children, manipulating folds to predict the future based on decisions made by the one seeking their fortune. The self destructing geometric paper structures talk to the ephemeral nature of all human construction. The child places faith in a paper object and constructs a hopeful and naive vision of the future; as humanity has, for so long, assumed its continued good fortune and permanence on earth. The work aims to pitch alternative narratives through image worlds and seeks out some of the deepest possibilities and consequences of human construction and destruction.


Thematic tags: Environment/ecology, abstraction, geological time, deep time, future fossils

Nat Tozer is an artist and experimental film maker based in Tāmaki Makaurau, working with paper, sculpture and video. Recent shows include Emerging Artists Show, Sanderson Gallery and Salted Earth, Sosage Gallery. Her work has been selected for Guangzhou Art Fair, Femisphere Zine, Headland Sculpture on the Gulf Pavilion, Art in the Dark; cinema entry, the Wallace Arts Trust, several Walker and Hall finalists exhibitions and a Summer Scholarship by the University of Auckland. Natalie holds a PGDipFA with distinction and is currently studying her MFA at Elam School of Fine Arts. She produces a range of events and media at LOT23 Studio and has been a guest curator for Q Theatre, Art Ache, Sky your TV and Threaded Magazine. She is the founder of the artists run gallery mothermother, which seeks modes of curatorial activism. 

natalietozer.com, @nattozer
mothermother.co.nz, @mothermother_archive
lot23.co.nz, @lot23studio


Edwina Stevens

Title: The Material Thing is Vibrating Into the Emptiness
Year: 2019
Length: 24:12
Format: Single-channel video

The material thing vibrating into the emptiness is a video work considering the change encounter across various materialities. In this work, two phenomena of light, materiality, and time intersect. One element is comprised of winter light filters through a Eucalyptus tree, refracted through a warped 100-year-old windowpane onto the wall, on an oblique angle for a brief moment every day over a week, then it is gone. Another element is also of winter light, filtered through a different Eucalyptus, refracting through a glass on a shelf causing it to ‘bend’ around a corner and streak down the hallway wall. These moments were recorded every morning for the week and compiled together as visuals for live performance. In this production of this video, the visual was arranged to sound, and then in response, the performance is made to the visual, exploring the relationship between the two and the potential they carry in this relationship.
Thematic tags: Performance, abstraction, sound

Title: Lands Line
Year: 2015
Length: 11:09
Format: Single-channel video

This work was developed as a circular projection as visuals for live sound performance.Filmed from the back of the Taieri Gorge Train from Dunedin to Middlemarch, the video has been drawn out across frames to restrict the viewer focusing on any particular detail, prioritising the motion of moving through this valley only accessible for the train-line, time and space blurs past us. The work addresses the colonial lines we Pakeha make and follow on the landscape, following/exploiting water lines and indigenous Māori travel routes, while reflecting on the timelessness and remoteness of rural Southern Aotearoa.
Thematic tags: Landscape, environment/ecology, decoloniality, sound

Edwina Stevens (Dunedin, Aotearoa/Melbourne) is an audiovisual artist working across composition, installation and live performance focusing on synthesized sound, field recordings, found acoustic elements/instruments and obsolete media. Her work investigates audiovisual processes of engaging with places that are collaborative, improvisational and serendipitous, exploring entanglements of the temporal, material and experiential through chance encounters, tangential processes and unanticipated outcomes.

www.vimeo.com/eves
www.disrhythms.net
www.soundcloud.com/e_eves
eves.bandcamp.com


Gabrielle Amodeo

Title: Slow and mournfully; slow and sad; slow and solemnly
Year: 2013
Length: 33:12
Format: Single-channel video
Credits: Performance by Maria Mall, filmed by Rory Drew
In a single performance of a piece of music split into two parts, the pianist plays through Eric Satie’s Gymnopedies (no. 1 – 3) three times consecutively, first using only one hand, and then the other, with the resulting recordings combined afterwards. Although the pianist initially keeps her timing, eventually the impossibility of splitting her performance takes its toll; the music becomes mistimed, occasionally to the point of discordant plinking. A listener knows what to expect when hearing a familiar piece of music: projecting forward along the path the music will take and jarred if something unexpected happens to a single note. Gymnopedies has a semi-ubiquitous quality: many people know the composition if they hear it, without knowing how they know it, who the composer is or when they first heard it. The spilt-recording of this strangely familiar piece of music unsettles the listener’s expectations as it weaves between being in-time and falling out of time.
Thematic tags: Abstraction, sound

Title: Little Boy Blue
Year: 2008
Length: 02:11
Format: Stop-motion animation
Credits: Song Little Boy Blue by Will Oldham, also known as Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy
In Little Boy Blue, the salt is taken off the kitchen table and made to run for all its worth, via a stop-motion animation made from a rubber stamp. For more than 50 years, New Zealand kitchen tables have been graced with Cerebos Iodised Table Salt and its invitation to “See how it runs”. This logo has become an enduring and endearing quirk of New Zealand’s visual culture. My animation is an acceptance of Cerebos’ long-standing invitation.Shown At: Part of my submission to the 2007 Young Blood Salon, and shown at the finalists’ show at City Art Rooms.  In 2009 Little Boy Blue was selected for the International Universities Program at LOOP’09: Barcelona Video Art Festival.  It was also shown at Viewfinder in 2011.

Gabrielle Amodeo is a practicing artist and writer living and working in Te Whanganui-a-Tara Wellington, New Zealand. She was the 2015 recipient of the Parkin Prize, and has shown at several of New Zealand’s premier public galleries, including Artspace (Auckland); Dunedin Public Art Gallery (Dunedin); Papakura Art Gallery (Auckland); The Dowse Art Museum (Wellington); and Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery (Auckland). During 2016, Amodeo completed the Late Winter Intensive Residency at The Banff Centre, Canada. As a current PhD candidate in Fine Arts at Massey University’s College of Creative Arts Toi Rauwharangi, her research, Conceptual Intimacy, looks at forms of intimacy within conceptual art practices. Amodeo’s research has a particular focus on artists who use epistolary creative-nonfiction writing in their artworks, as a form of intimacy-establishment within the artist/artwork/audience-viewer-participant nexus. The thinking that underlies Amodeo’s practice “During an interview on Brian Crump’s show Nights, on Radio New Zealand, I heard that karaoke translated to ‘empty orchestra’. I thought the phrase was beautiful; the starkness of ‘empty’ forms a demanding opposition to the rich voluptuousness of ‘orchestra’. To me the phrase speaks eloquently about processes of information lost/information gained; about the absent but remembered lyrics imperfectly filled by the performer, and the peculiar, almost estranged, relationship between the fixed recording and the temporal iteration of the moment. In my practice, I have long been interested in why things are familiar and how the familiar can be construed differently. Working on the basis of form following idea, I have used multiple mediums. Modelled on and modified from familiar sources and objects, the artwork enables a proliferation of meaning to gather around the source-object, creating an uncertainty and instability of sense. Each work follows a different methodology, logic or form, using some manner of disruption to set the meaning of the source-object at play. Over the past eighteen months, my very labour-intensive art practice has changed increasingly into a written art-practice—particularly creative-nonfiction essays. In my art and writing practice, accrued details are of deep importance. I frequently find the smallest measure of something—a form of drawn mark or the various nuances of meaning in a word—and then pay attention to that, and try to get other people alongside to pay attention to it as well. That intimacy of detail, of looking so closely at something over a considerable period of time, is a form of care that encapsulates my understanding of intimacy. Intimacy is personal. Intimacy is reading. Intimacy is knowledge. Intimacy is observation and attentiveness. It is an engagement of logic and emotion in tandem; long-term research and momentary, sensory experience in tandem. I see my work as being like listening to karaoke at that moment the relationship between song and iteration breaks down. It is a personal observation and altered translation of something familiar, where meaning becomes twisted in action and enunciation, causing an irruption that unravels the known.”

http://www.gabrielleamodeo.co.nz/


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