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Aydriannah Tuiali’i

Title: Kōwhai
Year: 2018
Length: 01:35
Credits: Performed and Edited by Aydriannah Tuiali’i
Kōwhai emerged from an exploration of the relationship – whakawhanaungatanga – between moving image, kapa haka and waiata. Kōwhai parallels the immersive experience of my ongoing commitment to learning Te Reo Māori, exemplifying the creation of Te Ao Māori – from nothing to something – passed down through generations via ngā momo kōrero or oral storytelling.
Thematic tags: Performance, narrative, body, abstraction, new media, technology, sound, spirituality, indigenous methodologies.

Aydriannah Tuiali’i is a moving image and installation artist of Ngāpuhi and Samoan (Ngāti Hāmoa) descent. She is a recent graduate of Te Wānanga Aronui o Tāmaki Makaurau (AUT), receiving a Bachelor of Visual Art majoring in Sculpture with a minor in Interaction and UX Design in 2016, and a Bachelor of Art and Design with First Class Honours in 2018. Aydriannah’s debut as a Set Designer was designing the set and visuals for the show Maumahara Girlie, created by Mya Morrison-Middleton and produced by Vanessa Crofskey. Maumahara Girlie won Outstanding Emerging Company at the Auckland Theatre Awards in 2018. She also recently designed the set for Ngā Puke, directed by Cian Elyse White in July 2019. Since graduating Aydriannah has been actively involved in many projects including: -Delivering a 3-day rangatahi filmmaking workshop in Samoa as part of Through Our Lens, Māoriland Charitable Trust. -Facilitating rangatahi filmmaking workshops across Aotearoa with Māoriland as part of the E Tū Whānau Filmmaking Challenge. -Co-curating the Māoriland Rangatahi Film Festival Programme as a member of Ngā Pakiaka – a committee of rangatahi filmmakers. -Screening her moving image artwork Kōwhai as part of: Māoriland Film Festival 2019 Wairoa Māori Film Festival 2019 Ngā Tohu o Uenuku (Mangere Art Centre) Matariki Exhibition He Toa! He Wahine! 2018 The Glaistor Ennor Postgraduate Awards 2018 at Sanderson Contemporary Gallery. Arts Out East 2018 at Te Tahawai Marae, Edgewater College. CIRCUIT Artist Film and Video Aotearoa’s Mason’s Screen Project in Wellington, 2018. Aside from designing the set for Ngā Puke, Aydriannah is currently working as a Freelance Video Editor at Whakaata Māori (Māori Television), while studying Te Reo Māori online through Te Wānanga o Raukawa. She hopes to develop a new artwork by the end of the year.

https://vimeo.com/user67962464


Emily Parr

Title: Te Aroha
Year: 2017
Length: 04:45
Format: HD video
Credits:
During the occupation* of Niki’s house, weekly waiata** nights have been held to foster whanaungatanga***. The collective voices can be heard along Taniwha Street on a Thursday evening, travelling easily because of the empty spaces. The redevelopment is physically dismantling Glen Innes, through the removal of houses by truck or demolition (in this video, 69 Taniwha Street). But in their place stands a different form of community – one that is growing ever stronger. On the day of filming (23/03), Niki had again been under a direct threat of eviction. She closed Waiata Club with this: “This has been the hardest day of these last six years. But we’re still here. And we’re still singing.”
Ngā mihi Tāmaki Housing Group & Waiata Club.
facebook.com/thishomeisoccupied
** song
*** kinship, a relationship of shared experiences through working together that creates a sense of belonging
Thematic tags: documentary, capitalism, politics, decoloniality, sound, spirituality, indigenous methodologies, housing (Te Aroha)

Title: Te Wai Mokoia
Year: 2016
Length: 17:30
Format: HD video
Credits:
Te Wai Mokoia was the winner of Uxbridge’s 10th Estuary Art Awards. It is a unique single edition belonging to the Auckland Council.

This work considers ecology not only in relation to biology, but in relation to a wider understanding of ecology – that of the relationships between people, their whenua, and social and political frameworks. It is centred on a specific ecology, presented through a kōrero between a kuia and her whāngai daughter, both long term residents of Glen Innes. The health of Te Wai Mokoia cannot be separated from its people, a community that is fighting to stay in their homes. 

Tāmaki is currently undergoing “regeneration”, a process through which thousands of state housing tenants are being affected. Many residents are refusing to be moved away from their homes – a collective resistance that is taking a huge toll on the community’s hauora. Our people are made vulnerable by a colonial capitalist state, and our safety nets are being removed through governmental policy.

The work considers all that extends from a house – childhood memories, the garden we bury in and grow from, and the environment surrounding it. For residents of Glen Innes, the estuary is a site of resource gathering, of learning and exploration, and a place to foster interconnectedness with nature. Te Wai Mokoia flows through this community as wairua tapu.
Thematic tags: documentary, capitalism, politics, decoloniality, environment/ecology, landscape sound, spirituality, indigenous methodologies, housing (Te Wai Mokoia)

Emily Parr (Ngāi Te Rangi, Moana, Pākehā) is a Tāmaki Makaurau based artist. Her current research (toward a Master of Visual Arts) is on settler-indigenous relationships of Te Moananui a Kiwa, and is anchored by those she descends from. Her moving-image practice weaves through time and space, seeking stories in archives, waters, and on haerenga to ancestral homelands. She is also a member of Accompany, an artists’ collective who walk and work alongside community organisations and social movements. Parr was the recipient of the 2019 Iris Fisher Scholarship and 2016 Tāmaki Estuary Art Award.

http://www.cargocollective.com/emilyparr


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