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Natalie Tozer

Title: Footpath Fossil (breathe)
Year: 2020
Length: 20:26
Format: Looped H265 10bit,
Credits: Director: Natalie Tozer
Director of Photography & Editor: Sam Tozer
Original Soundtrack: Paul Rhodes

My work documents exposed urban stratigraphy. I look for layers that aren’t meant to be seen. Curbside ruins. Crumbled footpaths. Potholes. These layers are visible histories of life/nonlife entangled within the ground. I interpret these small moments in our urban landscape as interruptions to capitalist strategies. Mythically and metaphorically rich, the ground provides us with clues, knowledge, refuge as well as the sunken networks of extraction, exploitation and disposal. The ground is active, generous and vulnerable. We lace it with tar seal, concrete and gravel; stone blasted and rendered for our urban environments. I see my practice as a way to read and understand the ground as the surface to a complex underland . By collecting, documenting and deciphering the findings, I hope to gather enough data to learn something. I like to reach out in the dark, to gaze into a possible future and let the practice reveal the rest.

This year, I have filmed broken footpaths near and around Karangahape Rd, Tāmaki Makaurau. The markings from tools and previous layers of broken grout lie exposed for interpretation like messages from the underland lurching upwards eager to be seen.The recent COVID19 rahui brought repair and construction of the footpath to a halt. During this lull in productivity and progress I captured footage which now acts as a fossil record. I want to show through the work that I deeply admire the well- used areas we travel through. I want to acknowledge and contemplate the beauty of its worn complexity and explore the idea that meaningful production should be a subset of ‘care’. This approach is about revealing the alternative strategies against capitalist modes of production, where we focus on tending and caring for what we have, instead of perpetuating in an ever-expanding frenzy.

The rahui gave me and my nine-year-old daughter Penelope time to walk around our neighborhood, where she carefully acted as a pathfinder and navigational keeper of our mutual discovery. Together, we found and surveyed small poetic moments of urban decay, some of which will never be fixed, remaining arrested in time just the way they are. These places are entanglements where the underground reaches through the ever-expanding mask of concrete, the mark of empire building since the Roman times. For me, these walks enact soft lines of experience and memory, weaving relational becomings in common worlds. They are perspectives on Life and Nonlife, and the offer of coexistence. Through exploring and striving to understand I try to invite the possibility of symbiotic and improbable collaborations into my practice and relationships.

Perhaps in years to come, this geontological learning and speculation will emerge into the next generation through Penelope. I smile when she unearths small findings from the curb, lichen encrusted tar seal crumbles. Like finding a perfect shell on a storm swept beach, she collects and clutches her find all the way home to show me. A small offering from the messy entangled ground.


Thematic tags: Documentary, capitalism, environment/ecology, abstraction, sound, family

Title: Soothsayer
Year: 2018
Length: 03:50
Format: 4K looped video
Credits: Director: Natalie Tozer, Director of Photography & Editor: Sam Tozer

The gentle, calming nature of this work establishes a contrast with the severity of social and environmental realities today. A meditative kaleidoscopic loop of destruction aims to scale potential future outcomes into a series of digestible alternative offerings. This video work slowly crushes folded paper ‘fortune tellers’; cootie catchers, chatterboxes, whirlybirds or paku-paku. Hand folded paper objects used by children, manipulating folds to predict the future based on decisions made by the one seeking their fortune. The self destructing geometric paper structures talk to the ephemeral nature of all human construction. The child places faith in a paper object and constructs a hopeful and naive vision of the future; as humanity has, for so long, assumed its continued good fortune and permanence on earth. The work aims to pitch alternative narratives through image worlds and seeks out some of the deepest possibilities and consequences of human construction and destruction.


Thematic tags: Environment/ecology, abstraction, geological time, deep time, future fossils

Nat Tozer is an artist and experimental film maker based in Tāmaki Makaurau, working with paper, sculpture and video. Recent shows include Emerging Artists Show, Sanderson Gallery and Salted Earth, Sosage Gallery. Her work has been selected for Guangzhou Art Fair, Femisphere Zine, Headland Sculpture on the Gulf Pavilion, Art in the Dark; cinema entry, the Wallace Arts Trust, several Walker and Hall finalists exhibitions and a Summer Scholarship by the University of Auckland. Natalie holds a PGDipFA with distinction and is currently studying her MFA at Elam School of Fine Arts. She produces a range of events and media at LOT23 Studio and has been a guest curator for Q Theatre, Art Ache, Sky your TV and Threaded Magazine. She is the founder of the artists run gallery mothermother, which seeks modes of curatorial activism. 

natalietozer.com, @nattozer
mothermother.co.nz, @mothermother_archive
lot23.co.nz, @lot23studio


Hana Pera Aoake

Title: Sex and the city but Maaori: Under southern skies
Year: 2019
Length: 05:11
Credits: Tēnā koutou to Calse Ross, George Watson, Alex Laurie, RNZ (You still don’t give a balanced or fair representation of Māori issues though, especially Ihumātao), Bindi Irwin, Nikki Webster, Kylie Minogue and Home and Away. Arohanui and kia kaha to the kaitiaki resisting colonial violence at Ihumātao, Djap Wurrung’s sacred birthing trees, Wet’suwet’en Nation and Mauna Kea. S/o’s to the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation, whose stolen land we now stand and show work on. Tino rangatiratanga! Ake! Ake Ake!


Kōwhai emerged from an exploration of the relationship – whakawhanaungatanga – between moving image, kapa haka and waiata. Kōwhai parallels the immersive experience of my ongoing commitment to learning Te Reo Māori, exemplifying the creation of Te Ao Māori – from nothing to something – passed down through generations via ngā momo kōrero or oral storytelling.
Thematic tags: Performance, narrative, body, abstraction, new media, technology, sound, spirituality, indigenous methodologies.

Title: Looking For Love
Year: 2017
Length: 01:32

Hana Pera Aoake (Ngaati Hinerangi, Ngaati Mahuta, Tainui/Waikato) is an artist, writer and teacher based in Te Wai Pounamu on Kai Tahu land. Hana co-founded Fresh and Fruity in 2014, and is now an editor at Tupuranga journal and Kei te pai press. Hana holds an MFA from Massey and recently completed the ISP programme at Maumaus des escola artes in Lisboa, Portugal. 

Keitepaipress.com 


Charlotte Parallel

Title: When do the trees sleep?
Year: 2017 Singapore
Length: 02:35
Credits: Asia New Zealand residency at A.I.R: Instinc Gallery Singapore. Videographer: Chin Wan Xuan

When do the trees sleep? is a poetic question that seeks to draw attention to the energetic forces that intersect within the streets of Singapore. When do the trees sleep? sound walk was part of a telematic performance with Jon He, held at INSTINC Gallery, 24th of March at 8pm. Singapore. Charlotte Parallel uses a DIY light-to-sound transducer/solar panel to amplifier, to play the ‘lumen noise’ as electrical networks in the block around Instinc Gallery.

Charlotte Parallel is a New Zealand artist based in Koputai Port Chalmers working in the fields of sculpture, sound, performance, collaboration and site responsive projects. Parallel completed her MFA at Otago School of Art Dunedin in 2016. She has exhibited throughout New Zealand and internationally since 2010.

Instagram: @charlotteparallel


Paige Pomana and Jazz dos Santos

Title: IN FRAME | Infamy Apparel
Year: 2020
Length: 04:25
Format: Single-channel video
Credits: Directed, filmed & produced by Paige Pomana & Jazz Dos Santos

IN FRAME is a collection of short films centred around the documentation of everyday creatives. Creative Director of Infamy Apparel, Amy Lautogo, spoke to us about shifting the paradigm of the portrayal of fat people in the fashion industry and how we need to reevaluate our individual conditioning under a colonial, capitalist, system.
Thematic tags: Performance, documentary, body, capitalism, politics, feminism, decoloniality, LGBTQ.

Sour Heart Productions is a videography production company based in Auckland, New Zealand. It was founded by filmmakers Paige Pomana and Jazz Dos Santos, who share a passion for artistic visual media and sound.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SourHeartProductions/
Instagram: @sourheartproductions
Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/sourheartproductions


Antonia Nisbet

Title: Take care now
Year: 2018
Length: 03:06
Format: Video based installation, double sided projection
Credits: With thanks to Lila and RM Gallery
Take care now uses performance, installation and video navigate the complexities of value and progress in relation to capitalism, and to illuminate the emotional labour present within daily processes of caring. Formed through a porous and durational threshold between art-making and ‘life-living’, Take care now is ultimately concerned with encouraging practices of caring response to encounter. It seeks to set up a consciousness and criticality regarding modes of maintenance, responsibility and privilege within daily interactions, and establishes a necessary change of pace in regards to ‘life-living’. This type of caring is not based in grand gestures, but rather is embedded in the accumulation of caring actions.

Installation view, RM Gallery, 2018


Thematic tags: Performance, Capitalism, Environment/ecology, Feminism, Sex and sexuality, Work/labour


Aydriannah Tuiali’i

Title: Kōwhai
Year: 2018
Length: 01:35
Credits: Performed and Edited by Aydriannah Tuiali’i
Kōwhai emerged from an exploration of the relationship – whakawhanaungatanga – between moving image, kapa haka and waiata. Kōwhai parallels the immersive experience of my ongoing commitment to learning Te Reo Māori, exemplifying the creation of Te Ao Māori – from nothing to something – passed down through generations via ngā momo kōrero or oral storytelling.
Thematic tags: Performance, narrative, body, abstraction, new media, technology, sound, spirituality, indigenous methodologies.

Aydriannah Tuiali’i is a moving image and installation artist of Ngāpuhi and Samoan (Ngāti Hāmoa) descent. She is a recent graduate of Te Wānanga Aronui o Tāmaki Makaurau (AUT), receiving a Bachelor of Visual Art majoring in Sculpture with a minor in Interaction and UX Design in 2016, and a Bachelor of Art and Design with First Class Honours in 2018. Aydriannah’s debut as a Set Designer was designing the set and visuals for the show Maumahara Girlie, created by Mya Morrison-Middleton and produced by Vanessa Crofskey. Maumahara Girlie won Outstanding Emerging Company at the Auckland Theatre Awards in 2018. She also recently designed the set for Ngā Puke, directed by Cian Elyse White in July 2019. Since graduating Aydriannah has been actively involved in many projects including: -Delivering a 3-day rangatahi filmmaking workshop in Samoa as part of Through Our Lens, Māoriland Charitable Trust. -Facilitating rangatahi filmmaking workshops across Aotearoa with Māoriland as part of the E Tū Whānau Filmmaking Challenge. -Co-curating the Māoriland Rangatahi Film Festival Programme as a member of Ngā Pakiaka – a committee of rangatahi filmmakers. -Screening her moving image artwork Kōwhai as part of: Māoriland Film Festival 2019 Wairoa Māori Film Festival 2019 Ngā Tohu o Uenuku (Mangere Art Centre) Matariki Exhibition He Toa! He Wahine! 2018 The Glaistor Ennor Postgraduate Awards 2018 at Sanderson Contemporary Gallery. Arts Out East 2018 at Te Tahawai Marae, Edgewater College. CIRCUIT Artist Film and Video Aotearoa’s Mason’s Screen Project in Wellington, 2018. Aside from designing the set for Ngā Puke, Aydriannah is currently working as a Freelance Video Editor at Whakaata Māori (Māori Television), while studying Te Reo Māori online through Te Wānanga o Raukawa. She hopes to develop a new artwork by the end of the year.

https://vimeo.com/user67962464


Emily Parr

Title: Te Aroha
Year: 2017
Length: 04:45
Format: HD video
Credits:
During the occupation* of Niki’s house, weekly waiata** nights have been held to foster whanaungatanga***. The collective voices can be heard along Taniwha Street on a Thursday evening, travelling easily because of the empty spaces. The redevelopment is physically dismantling Glen Innes, through the removal of houses by truck or demolition (in this video, 69 Taniwha Street). But in their place stands a different form of community – one that is growing ever stronger. On the day of filming (23/03), Niki had again been under a direct threat of eviction. She closed Waiata Club with this: “This has been the hardest day of these last six years. But we’re still here. And we’re still singing.”
Ngā mihi Tāmaki Housing Group & Waiata Club.
facebook.com/thishomeisoccupied
** song
*** kinship, a relationship of shared experiences through working together that creates a sense of belonging
Thematic tags: documentary, capitalism, politics, decoloniality, sound, spirituality, indigenous methodologies, housing (Te Aroha)

Title: Te Wai Mokoia
Year: 2016
Length: 17:30
Format: HD video
Credits:
Te Wai Mokoia was the winner of Uxbridge’s 10th Estuary Art Awards. It is a unique single edition belonging to the Auckland Council.

This work considers ecology not only in relation to biology, but in relation to a wider understanding of ecology – that of the relationships between people, their whenua, and social and political frameworks. It is centred on a specific ecology, presented through a kōrero between a kuia and her whāngai daughter, both long term residents of Glen Innes. The health of Te Wai Mokoia cannot be separated from its people, a community that is fighting to stay in their homes. 

Tāmaki is currently undergoing “regeneration”, a process through which thousands of state housing tenants are being affected. Many residents are refusing to be moved away from their homes – a collective resistance that is taking a huge toll on the community’s hauora. Our people are made vulnerable by a colonial capitalist state, and our safety nets are being removed through governmental policy.

The work considers all that extends from a house – childhood memories, the garden we bury in and grow from, and the environment surrounding it. For residents of Glen Innes, the estuary is a site of resource gathering, of learning and exploration, and a place to foster interconnectedness with nature. Te Wai Mokoia flows through this community as wairua tapu.
Thematic tags: documentary, capitalism, politics, decoloniality, environment/ecology, landscape sound, spirituality, indigenous methodologies, housing (Te Wai Mokoia)

Emily Parr (Ngāi Te Rangi, Moana, Pākehā) is a Tāmaki Makaurau based artist. Her current research (toward a Master of Visual Arts) is on settler-indigenous relationships of Te Moananui a Kiwa, and is anchored by those she descends from. Her moving-image practice weaves through time and space, seeking stories in archives, waters, and on haerenga to ancestral homelands. She is also a member of Accompany, an artists’ collective who walk and work alongside community organisations and social movements. Parr was the recipient of the 2019 Iris Fisher Scholarship and 2016 Tāmaki Estuary Art Award.

http://www.cargocollective.com/emilyparr


Denise Batchelor

Title: Shipped
Year: 2013
Length: 03:38
Format: HD Video, ProRes 422
Shipped references the constant passages of container vessels plying the invisible highways of global commerce. Essential to international trade, these vessels carry bulk cargo in order to satisfy the ever-increasing populations need for goods.The sound of the foghorn elicits a warning, a metaphor perhaps for the danger in supporting a continuum in what has become unsustainable growth.

Thematic tags: Landscape, capitalism, environment/ecology, sound, ocean

Denise Batchelor is a visual artist based in the far north of New Zealand, where she works primarily in the mediums of video and photography. Through personal encounters within nature and the immediate world around her, Batchelor explores the subject of connection; those moments in time that evoke a sense of kinship and/or empathy. Capturing moments that simultaneously embrace the familiar, yet reflect the overlooked or unnoticed, Batchelor’s work invites contemplation.
“A visual artist since 2008, my methodology is initially driven by a strong sense of curiosity and a deep engagement with the environment and the biodiversity within it”.
Batchelor has exhibited widely in galleries, art centres and festivals, both nationally and internationally. The recipient of artist residencies and art awards, Batchelor graduated MFA (Hons) from Whitecliffe College of Arts & Design, Auckland (2010).

www.denisebatchelor.com
https://www.facebook.com/denisebatchelor.artist/
https://www.instagram.com/batchelordenise/


Becky Nunes

Title: An Age of Iron
Year: 2020
Length: 08:16
Format: HD video
Credits: Director: Becky Nunes

This short experimental documentary asks the audience to consider land rights, resource extraction, ownership, and our relationships with more-than-human materials and place.
Tahāroa is a tiny settlement to the South-West of the Kawhia harbor, in the North Island of New Zealand. At the end of a long winding road the township itself sits in a tight huddle of new and older houses and workers’ cottages. N.Z Steel first brokered an agreement with local tribe Ngāti Mahuta ki te Hauāuru in the 70’s to extract the titanomagnetite from the sands and ship it offshore for use in the
construction of steel. Tucked out of sight, over the headland, the dredging operation of this iron-ore extraction from the volcanic black sands of the foreshore has been continuing unabated for 40 years.
Nunes’ film asks what prolonged mineral extraction and the re-introduction of that material into the global manufacturing chain might mean for the mauri (or
spirit) of the land, and for our planetary relationships.
Thematic tags: Documentary, mining, ecology, labour

Title: Open Home – a glimpse into Ann Shelton’s House Work.
Year: 2016
Length: 06:00
Format: HD video
Credits: Director/Producer: Becky Nunes
On December 5th and 6th of 2015 groups of curious guests were invited to attend an offsite event as part of Enjoy Gallery’s Enjoy Feminisms exhibition. This event took place in a house designed for Nancy Martin, a musician and educator, by immigrant architect Frederick Ost, in 1957. Artist Ann Shelton and her partner now live in this house, and in House Work Shelton and ghost-writer Pip Adam weave together past and present, archive and fiction. This film is a document of that event.
Thematic tags: performance, documentary, capitalism, politics, feminism, work/labour

Title: Pictures on Paper – The Photobook in New Zealand
Year: 2017
Length: 27:00
Format: HD video
Credits: Director: Becky Nunes & Anita Totha Producer: Becky Nunes. Sound: David Cowlard. Camera: Parisa Taghizadeh & David Cowlard. A Tangent Production
The photo-book has enjoyed a meteoric rise in recent years. Combined with on-demand publishing it now offers photographers unprecedented and unmediated access to audiences for their work. From a bespoke and limited edition artist book to a large print run showcasing the entire body of work of an artist, the photo-book has shifted from background to foreground for the attention of art fairs, libraries and collectors. This short documentary charts some of the key moments in the history of the photo book in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Interviews with early proponents of the form such as photographer/publisher Haru Sameshima and photographer David Cook give context. Harvey Benge talks about his long-term obsession with the photobook format, his own printed works and his extensive collection.Importantly, the film also foregrounds the now; a slice of contemporary bookmaking in the early 21st Century. Solomon Mortimer, David Cook & Ann Shelton are some of the important lens-based artists working in the medium today. This documentary has no claims on any encyclopedic qualities. Rather, it aims to intrigue, inspire and provoke debate around a medium that, in the South Pacific at least, is still in its teenage years. The photo book, like any art form linked intrinsically with technology as its means of production, is on the move. What this film portrays as the “now” of 2015 will be an important archival contribution to our collective imaging history in the turn of a page.
Thematic tags:Documentary, history of New Zealand photography

Becky Nunes is a lens-based artist and educator. Her images have been awarded, published & exhibited locally and internationally. Nunes is a founder member of Tangent Collective. She works at the nexus of fine art and documentary practice, most recently producing and directing the awarded documentary film This Air is a Material. Her primary field of research is the complex arena of site, subject and the co-authoring of representation. Her work articulates, via photographs, moving image and sound, some of the complex narratives of Aotearoa in the era of the Anthropocene.

http://www.facebook.com/sheltonfilm


Matilda Fraser

Title: The Race Marches Forward on the Feet of Little Children
Year: 2018
Length: 08:37
Format: Single channel video
A film about Sir Frederic Truby King, the eccentric founder of Plunket Society in New Zealand in 1907. He worked to promote mothercraft, breastfeeding, and the training of women as nurses, campaigned against over-educating women, and contributed literature to the eugenics movement.
Thematic tags: Narrative, landscape, capitalism, politics, environment, feminism, work/labour,

Title: The Eight Hours Plan
Year: 2017
Length: 04:08
Format: single channel video
An ode to Samuel Duncan Parnell, a man instrumental to founding the eight hour working day in New Zealand in 1842.
Thematic tags: landscape, politics, capitalism, work/labour

Matilda Fraser (BFA Hons, 2012, Massey University; MFA 2016, Elam) is an artist and writer based in Wellington, New Zealand. Recent shows include The Race Marches Forward on the Feet of Little Children, Blue Oyster, 2018; I digress, Enjoy, 2017; The Eight Hours Plan, Mason’s Screen, 2017; New Perspectives, Artspace, 2016. She was the 2015 Writer-in-Residence at Blue Oyster Art Project Space, Dunedin, producing a series of nested texts entitled Against Efficiency about the nature of criticism.

http://www.lumiere.net.nz/against-efficiency/


Moving Image Archive is a RM Gallery and Project Space project
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We are  2 minutes walk from Artspace, Ivan Anthony and Michael Lett.

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