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Yakuri Kaihori

Title: Mono No Aware
Year: 2015
Length: 02:39
Format: Digital video

Mono no aware – is one of Japanese aesthetic value, an awareness of the impermanence and transience of life and the gentle sadness and wistfulness that comes with this knowledge – literally translates to “the pathos of things”. Mono no aware is universal that can be experienced by anyone though accepting life as it is relates to the core of the Zen practice. It teaches the mankind is not the centre of the world but in observing nature we see the life and death cycle and the mortality of being: everything with a beginning has an ending. This aesthetic put the emphasis on the ephemerality of mankind and insists that the we observes time and being. The present moment is the product of what has been done in the past. This work was made during the 3-months artist residency and exhibited at 30 Upstairs Art Space in Wellington in 2015 along with the series of paintings.
Thematic tags: Landscape, politics, environment/ecology, decoloniality, history, spirituality

Yukari Kaihori is a visual artist currently based in Tāmaki Makaurau. Kaihori is primarily a painter whose works change from project to project but a theme she often investigates is the “in- between-ness” of cultural and social values, the physicality of artworks, the Western and the Eastern, organic and mechanic, permanent and temporary, and nature and men. She has exhibited her work in both public and private spaces including we painted the wall with cracks (2020) play_station, This Land is All We Know (2019) Hastings City Art Gallery, Infinite Planes ( 2019) Parlour Project and Blue Fancy ( 2019) Milford Galleries. She was the recipient of Pollock Krasner Foundation Grant award in 2015 (NY), and was a Fellow at the Vermont Studio Center, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and Oberpfälzer Künstlerhaus in Germany.

https://www.instagram.com/yukari.kaihori


Laura Duffy

Title: Garden of Purity
Year: 2018
Length: Various
Format: Digital video
Garden of Purity considers how we read and ingest imagery, drawing links through history from art history to advertising. Duffy sees the works as being a layered conversation about Catholicism, advertising, abjection, and queerness. She uses edible materials as a starting point for the series of digitally manipulated photographs in the light boxes and online video works. The series intends to prompt questions about traditional notions of beauty and divinity by blurring the lines between repulsion and desire. 
Thematic tags: Performance, narrative, body, abstraction, new media, technology, sound, spirituality, indigenous methodologies.

Laura Duffy’s photographic and video works explore the objectification of the feminine body. Using food as a sculptural material, she draws on gestural techniques found within the world of modern advertising including dripping, dropping, pouring and slow motion. With reference to art historical still life, the work asserts positive identification of women and femmes as subject over object as well as exposing the abject treatment of the feminine image throughout history.

https://www.circuit.org.nz/artist/laura-duffy


Emily Parr

Title: Te Aroha
Year: 2017
Length: 04:45
Format: HD video
Credits:
During the occupation* of Niki’s house, weekly waiata** nights have been held to foster whanaungatanga***. The collective voices can be heard along Taniwha Street on a Thursday evening, travelling easily because of the empty spaces. The redevelopment is physically dismantling Glen Innes, through the removal of houses by truck or demolition (in this video, 69 Taniwha Street). But in their place stands a different form of community – one that is growing ever stronger. On the day of filming (23/03), Niki had again been under a direct threat of eviction. She closed Waiata Club with this: “This has been the hardest day of these last six years. But we’re still here. And we’re still singing.”
Ngā mihi Tāmaki Housing Group & Waiata Club.
facebook.com/thishomeisoccupied
** song
*** kinship, a relationship of shared experiences through working together that creates a sense of belonging
Thematic tags: documentary, capitalism, politics, decoloniality, sound, spirituality, indigenous methodologies, housing (Te Aroha)

Title: Te Wai Mokoia
Year: 2016
Length: 17:30
Format: HD video
Credits:
Te Wai Mokoia was the winner of Uxbridge’s 10th Estuary Art Awards. It is a unique single edition belonging to the Auckland Council.

This work considers ecology not only in relation to biology, but in relation to a wider understanding of ecology – that of the relationships between people, their whenua, and social and political frameworks. It is centred on a specific ecology, presented through a kōrero between a kuia and her whāngai daughter, both long term residents of Glen Innes. The health of Te Wai Mokoia cannot be separated from its people, a community that is fighting to stay in their homes. 

Tāmaki is currently undergoing “regeneration”, a process through which thousands of state housing tenants are being affected. Many residents are refusing to be moved away from their homes – a collective resistance that is taking a huge toll on the community’s hauora. Our people are made vulnerable by a colonial capitalist state, and our safety nets are being removed through governmental policy.

The work considers all that extends from a house – childhood memories, the garden we bury in and grow from, and the environment surrounding it. For residents of Glen Innes, the estuary is a site of resource gathering, of learning and exploration, and a place to foster interconnectedness with nature. Te Wai Mokoia flows through this community as wairua tapu.
Thematic tags: documentary, capitalism, politics, decoloniality, environment/ecology, landscape sound, spirituality, indigenous methodologies, housing (Te Wai Mokoia)

Emily Parr (Ngāi Te Rangi, Moana, Pākehā) is a Tāmaki Makaurau based artist. Her current research (toward a Master of Visual Arts) is on settler-indigenous relationships of Te Moananui a Kiwa, and is anchored by those she descends from. Her moving-image practice weaves through time and space, seeking stories in archives, waters, and on haerenga to ancestral homelands. She is also a member of Accompany, an artists’ collective who walk and work alongside community organisations and social movements. Parr was the recipient of the 2019 Iris Fisher Scholarship and 2016 Tāmaki Estuary Art Award.

http://www.cargocollective.com/emilyparr


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