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Louise Stevenson

Title: In Conversation with the Architect
Year: 2012
Length: 18.00
Format: Digital video

Documentary like, this work re-visits a recorded conversation with Stevenson’s then ninety year old father, Charles Stevenson, about the King George Sixth Secondary School in Honiara, Solomon Islands which he designed in 1964. He was an architect in the British Colonial Service in Nigeria and Solomon Islands during the 1950s to 1970s and played a key role in the implementation of modern infrastructure in those tropical colonies. In the film, their discussion is enacted through their hands pointing to more recent footage of the buildings fifty years later in 2011, while an edited text of their dialogue runs in parallel to this. Perspectives on colonial history and national independence weave through the conversation between father and daughter highlighting generational shifts and memory slippage. The work considers issues at stake in the inter-relationship between spoken word and materiality via conversation, architectural history and representational film imagery. Stevenson discusses this work in her paper (Re)constructing Tropical Architecture in Solomon Islands: Conversations with my Father,” Fabrications: The Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, 24:2, 214-243
Thematic tags: Documentary, body, decoloniality, history, family, architecture, modernism.

Louise Stevenson’s practice spans broadly across drawing, painting, installation, photography and film. Her work predominantly engages with the position of being “outside” and a shifting relationship to place. She draws on non-Western ideas of navigation that locate a floating-fixed position on the Ocean. The formative experience of growing up as an expatriate in Honiara, Solomon Islands, as well as travelling and living in Europe, informs this interest. Projects include drawing series related to living in Budapest, Hungary, paintings exploring transparency and opacity, installations working with objects and materials referencing memory, and photographic and film work exploring the legacy of modern architecture in the tropics (includes MFA and Doctoral work).

Archival material, along with associated personal histories and their intersection with the public domain, informs Stevenson’s more recent work. An ongoing project involves the research and visual exploration of a substantial photographic archive gifted to Stevenson by her father who was an architect in the British Colonial service in Nigeria and Solomon Islands. This archive records tropical modern architecture’s trajectory from Africa to the Pacific, and a particular geo-political era of colonial and modernist history. Stevenson’s work attempts to re-represent this history within a framework of shifting perspectives while holding the irresolvable space of colonial history. Several projects stem from this research with on-going multi-form presentations across photography, film, installation and writing.

louisestevenson.net


Yakuri Kaihori

Title: Mono No Aware
Year: 2015
Length: 02:39
Format: Digital video

Mono no aware – is one of Japanese aesthetic value, an awareness of the impermanence and transience of life and the gentle sadness and wistfulness that comes with this knowledge – literally translates to “the pathos of things”. Mono no aware is universal that can be experienced by anyone though accepting life as it is relates to the core of the Zen practice. It teaches the mankind is not the centre of the world but in observing nature we see the life and death cycle and the mortality of being: everything with a beginning has an ending. This aesthetic put the emphasis on the ephemerality of mankind and insists that the we observes time and being. The present moment is the product of what has been done in the past. This work was made during the 3-months artist residency and exhibited at 30 Upstairs Art Space in Wellington in 2015 along with the series of paintings.
Thematic tags: Landscape, politics, environment/ecology, decoloniality, history, spirituality

Yukari Kaihori is a visual artist currently based in Tāmaki Makaurau. Kaihori is primarily a painter whose works change from project to project but a theme she often investigates is the “in- between-ness” of cultural and social values, the physicality of artworks, the Western and the Eastern, organic and mechanic, permanent and temporary, and nature and men. She has exhibited her work in both public and private spaces including we painted the wall with cracks (2020) play_station, This Land is All We Know (2019) Hastings City Art Gallery, Infinite Planes ( 2019) Parlour Project and Blue Fancy ( 2019) Milford Galleries. She was the recipient of Pollock Krasner Foundation Grant award in 2015 (NY), and was a Fellow at the Vermont Studio Center, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and Oberpfälzer Künstlerhaus in Germany.

https://www.instagram.com/yukari.kaihori


Raewyn Turner

Title: Fallible
Year: 2016
Length: 03:49
Format: HD video
Credits: Cinematography: Raewyn Turner & Brian HarrisEditing and green screen: Raewyn Turner

To detect the scent variations in flowers, unscented flowers rotate above a vase which holds a sensor. As the rotating flowers are passed over the smell sensor a computer fan draws their scent past a ceramic bead sensor and a microprocessor measures a voltage dependent on the scent concentration and type. The notes are synthesised in piano voice. The sound changes as the flowers wilt and die. Synopsis: The political and cultural interests of the 1700’s that sent out explorers to collect exotic and rare botanical specimens also created an aesthetic of beauty that embodied the precarious balance of life; one tilt out of balance, one degree of heat, one minute and its gone. 
We’re exploring the fragrance of contemporary existence, illusion, and sense-making in a largely visual culture. We’re interested in subliminal odours, airborne particles that affect minds and emotions.


Thematic tags: environment and ecology, technology, history, affect, sound, olfactory

Title: Lucky
Year: 2006
Length: 21:51
Format: Digital
Lucky is a documentary about the making of a fragrance to fortify the lower senses of the gambler playing with chance on pokie machines, which are essentially random number generators. Each perfume bottle is unique as there is a random number generator in the design.
Thematic tags: environment and ecology, technology, affect, olfactory

Title: Pick Up Styx
Year: 2008
Length: 01:04
Format: Interactive software
Credits:
The video interacts with the movements of the players playing a game of pick up sticks which were each fragranced with celebrity perfumes brought to market during the years ofthe war on terror 2001-2008
Thematic tags: politics, history, olfactory, technology, interactive

Raewyn Turner’s interdisciplinary work is concerned with cross-sensory perception and the uncharted territories of the senses. Her works have been shown in numerous national and international exhibitions including Museum of Contemporary Art, LA, Parque de las Ciencias, Granada, Spain, 11th Prague Quadrennial of Scenography and Theatre Architecture 2007,Prumyslovy Palace, Prague, Argentina, Georges Pompidou Center, Te Papa Museum, and Academy of Fine Arts, New Zealand. She has worked with olfaction since 1999 and in collaboration with Dr Richard Newcomb, molecular biologist, NZ. In 2011 she was recipient of a Fulbright Travel Grant for an artists residency at Monell Chemical Senses Center, Philadelphia. Her works include videos, interactive installations, performances, exhibitions and large scale international performance in theatres and stadiums, working as a concept and design artist and lighting designer in collaborations with musicians, orchestras and choreographers.

http://www.raewynturner.com


Becky Nunes

Title: An Age of Iron
Year: 2020
Length: 08:16
Format: HD video
Credits: Director: Becky Nunes

This short experimental documentary asks the audience to consider land rights, resource extraction, ownership, and our relationships with more-than-human materials and place.
Tahāroa is a tiny settlement to the South-West of the Kawhia harbor, in the North Island of New Zealand. At the end of a long winding road the township itself sits in a tight huddle of new and older houses and workers’ cottages. N.Z Steel first brokered an agreement with local tribe Ngāti Mahuta ki te Hauāuru in the 70’s to extract the titanomagnetite from the sands and ship it offshore for use in the
construction of steel. Tucked out of sight, over the headland, the dredging operation of this iron-ore extraction from the volcanic black sands of the foreshore has been continuing unabated for 40 years.
Nunes’ film asks what prolonged mineral extraction and the re-introduction of that material into the global manufacturing chain might mean for the mauri (or
spirit) of the land, and for our planetary relationships.
Thematic tags: Documentary, mining, ecology, labour

Title: Open Home – a glimpse into Ann Shelton’s House Work.
Year: 2016
Length: 06:00
Format: HD video
Credits: Director/Producer: Becky Nunes
On December 5th and 6th of 2015 groups of curious guests were invited to attend an offsite event as part of Enjoy Gallery’s Enjoy Feminisms exhibition. This event took place in a house designed for Nancy Martin, a musician and educator, by immigrant architect Frederick Ost, in 1957. Artist Ann Shelton and her partner now live in this house, and in House Work Shelton and ghost-writer Pip Adam weave together past and present, archive and fiction. This film is a document of that event.
Thematic tags: performance, documentary, capitalism, politics, feminism, work/labour

Title: Pictures on Paper – The Photobook in New Zealand
Year: 2017
Length: 27:00
Format: HD video
Credits: Director: Becky Nunes & Anita Totha Producer: Becky Nunes. Sound: David Cowlard. Camera: Parisa Taghizadeh & David Cowlard. A Tangent Production
The photo-book has enjoyed a meteoric rise in recent years. Combined with on-demand publishing it now offers photographers unprecedented and unmediated access to audiences for their work. From a bespoke and limited edition artist book to a large print run showcasing the entire body of work of an artist, the photo-book has shifted from background to foreground for the attention of art fairs, libraries and collectors. This short documentary charts some of the key moments in the history of the photo book in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Interviews with early proponents of the form such as photographer/publisher Haru Sameshima and photographer David Cook give context. Harvey Benge talks about his long-term obsession with the photobook format, his own printed works and his extensive collection.Importantly, the film also foregrounds the now; a slice of contemporary bookmaking in the early 21st Century. Solomon Mortimer, David Cook & Ann Shelton are some of the important lens-based artists working in the medium today. This documentary has no claims on any encyclopedic qualities. Rather, it aims to intrigue, inspire and provoke debate around a medium that, in the South Pacific at least, is still in its teenage years. The photo book, like any art form linked intrinsically with technology as its means of production, is on the move. What this film portrays as the “now” of 2015 will be an important archival contribution to our collective imaging history in the turn of a page.
Thematic tags:Documentary, history of New Zealand photography

Becky Nunes is a lens-based artist and educator. Her images have been awarded, published & exhibited locally and internationally. Nunes is a founder member of Tangent Collective. She works at the nexus of fine art and documentary practice, most recently producing and directing the awarded documentary film This Air is a Material. Her primary field of research is the complex arena of site, subject and the co-authoring of representation. Her work articulates, via photographs, moving image and sound, some of the complex narratives of Aotearoa in the era of the Anthropocene.

http://www.facebook.com/sheltonfilm


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